[DigitalScholarship] DIGITAL INITIATIVES: 3D PRINTING : CONJOINED TWINS : MEDICAL: PROCEDURES : DECISION MAKING : UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HEALTH (UF HEALTH): Florida Doctors Separate Conjoined Twins Connected at Heart With Help of 3-D Printing

 

.

.

DIGITAL INITIATIVES: 3D PRINTING :

CONJOINED TWINS :

MEDICAL: PROCEDURES :

DECISION MAKING :

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HEALTH (UF HEALTH):

Florida Doctors Separate Conjoined Twins
Connected at Heart With Help of 3-D Printing

.

.

Florida Doctors Separate Conjoined Twins
Connected at Heart With Help of 3-D Printing

By AVIANNE TAN

September 2, 2016, 2:43 PM ET

ABC News

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/
florida-doctors-separate-conjoined-twins-connected-heart-printing/ story?id=41823333

.

A shorter URL for the above link:

.

http://tinyurl.com/hx2jpln

.

.

Doctors at a hospital in Gainesville, Florida, recently separated conjoined twin girls with the help of 3-D printing, University of Florida Health (UF Health) announced this week.

.

Though the procedure happened in June, hospital officials and the twins’ parents only decided to make an announcement this Wednesday, according to UF Health media relations coordinator Rossana Passaniti.

.

She told ABC News today they wanted to make sure the twins were well into their recovery before sharing news of the successful separation. The parents, Mark and Jacquelyn (who wished not to be identified by their last names), decided “now was a good time” since they were preparing to finally get to take their girls home.

.

The twins, Scarlett and Savannah, were born at UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital in April, according to a news release from UF Health. The babies “each had their own complete set of organs but were attached at the liver, diaphragm, sternum and heart.”

.

“It was a really complex connection because it was close to very important veins in the hearts of both babies,” said Dr. Mark Bleiweis in the news release.

.

Bleiweis is chief of pediatric and congenital cardiovascular surgery at UF Health and the one who performed the heart separation for the twins.

.

There “have not been many successful separations with a cardiac connection,” Bleiweis explained. “It became a very challenging planning process for us.”

.

To help the doctors prepare for the risky procedure, they created what they believe is the “first-ever 3-D printed conjoined twin heart,” UF Health said.

.

The life-sized model allowed surgeons to examine the twins’ shared structures in the heart and practice the surgical separation itself, the health system explained.

.

The actual procedure took about six to eight hours, according to UF Health. To differentiate between the various tubes and electrical wires keeping the twins alive, surgeons wrapped them in orange tape for one girl and blue tape for the other.

.

After the separation, the sisters still had to undergo over a dozen more surgeries each to repair where they had once been connected, UF Health said.

.

But now, three months after they were first separated, Scarett and Savannah getting ready to go home.

.

.

The complete articles may be read at the URLs provided for each.

.

.

Twins born joined at the heart survive separation at UF Health Shands

By Deborah Strange

The Gainesville Sun

Gainesville.com

http://www.gainesville.com/news/20160831/ twins-born-joined-at-heart-survive-separation-at-uf-health-shands

.

A shorter URL for the above link:

.

http://tinyurl.com/h92q9jp

.

.

The first 20 weeks of Jacquelyns pregnancy seemed normal, until a scan gave an ultrasound technician pause.

.

Jacquelyn, who thought she was carrying one baby, was carrying two. The twins were conjoined at the heart, liver, sternum and diaphragm.

.

Three doctors told Jacquelyn and her partner, Mark, that the babies couldnt survive.

.

Thirty-five weeks and five days into her pregnancy, Jacquelyn delivered the girls via cesarean section April 12 at UF Health Shands Hospital.

.

In June, the twins were separated.

.

snip

.

Jacquelyn and Mark, who are keeping their family name private, were referred to UF Health and its Congenital Heart Center. Dr. Jennifer Co-Vu, director of UFs Fetal Cardiac Program, saw Jacquelyn at 22 weeks and thought there was a chance for the babies to survive, conjoined or separated.

.

It really took us a while to grasp that, Jacquelyn said. We had been told no for so long. Jubilation followed the shock, Mark said.

.

A team of doctors in surgery, cardiology, obstetrics and gynecology, neonatology, radiology, anesthesiology, plastic surgery and respiratory therapy were involved in planning the babies delivery, separation and pre- and post-operative care.

.

It took a village, literally, to separate these twins, said Dr. Saleem Islam, chief of UF Healths pediatric surgery division.

.

Scarlett and Savannah weighed a combined 10 pounds and 8 ounces when they were born. Jacquelyn was awake and anxious during her C-section, she said.

.

Each girl had her own complete set of organs. Scarlett and Savannah were born facing each other, and they stayed like that in the hospital until their separation in June.

.

Planning the surgery took hundreds of hours, Co-Vu said. Using an MRI and CT scan of the babies hearts, the team strategized the separation with a lifesize 3-D model  likely the first of its kind, according to UF Health.

.

.

.

Conjoined twins connected at the heart and liver
successfully separated at UF Health

August 31, 2016

ROSSANA PASSANITI

http://news.ufl.edu/articles/2016/08/conjoined-twins-connected- at-the-heart-and-liver-successfully-separated-at-uf-health.php

.

A shorter URL for the above link:

.

http://tinyurl.com/gojnw4l

.

.

Conjoined twin girls who were connected at the heart and other organs have been successfully separated in an extremely rare surgery performed by physicians at University Florida Health Shands Childrens Hospital.

.

The girls, who were born at UF Health Shands Hospital in April and separated in June, each had their own complete set of organs but were attached at the liver, diaphragm, sternum and heart, called a thoraco-omphalopagus connection. Their hearts were the most critical element of the separation, according to Dr. Mark Bleiweis, M.D., chief of pediatric and congenital cardiovascular surgery at UF Health and the surgeon who performed the heart separation. The twins shared a connection at the upper chamber of the heart, called the atrium, where blood enters the heart.

.

It was a really complex connection because it was close to very important veins in the hearts of both babies, Bleiweis said. In the world, there have not been many successful separations with a cardiac connection. It became a very challenging planning process for us, and, ultimately, a challenging separation.

.

Dr. Jennifer Co-Vu, M.D., FAAP, specializes in fetal cardiac care. She first studied the physiology of the unborn twins during an hourslong ultrasound in Jacquelyns 21st week of pregnancy and she told the parents she thought that not only would the babies survive birth, they also would survive after they were born. The parents had two options: to attempt separation, or to be prepared to raise conjoined twins, Co-Vu said.

.

snip

.

When I saw the heart structures and liver structures in utero, I had a feeling that we could separate them, but I had to examine the anatomy more closely and consult with my cardiology colleagues at the UF Health Congenital Heart Center, said Co-Vu, director of the Fetal Cardiac Program. I was able to give them hope, yet at the same time, I told them I was cautiously optimistic.  We are very fortunate that this was a success.

.

Conjoined twins occur only in about 1 in 200,000 live births. Between 40 and 60 percent of conjoined twins are stillborn, and 35 percent who live through birth survive only one day, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Only about 5 to 25 percent of conjoined twins survive, and survival of twins connected at the heart is extremely rare. In cases where the hearts are joined, the decision is often made to not do separation surgery in cases where there is a connection at the heart.

.

In addition to being joined at the heart, the girls also shared a large, fused liver, according to Saleem Islam, M.D., M.P.H., chief of the division of pediatric surgery in the UF College of Medicine.

.

The liver, from all of the imaging we obtained both before the babies birth and after they were born, indicated that it was almost like one giant liver without any true plane of separation, Islam said.

.

Without a clear picture of how to separate the liver before the surgery took place, Islam and his team had to use a method called intraoperative ultrasound to guide the separation. Using this method, Islam looked for areas of the joined liver that were free from large blood vessels.

.

.

.

Conjoined twins defy death with surgery that separates their hearts

By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS

http://news.heart.org/conjoined-twins-defy-death- with-surgery-that-separates-their-hearts/

.

A shorter URL for the above link:

.

http://tinyurl.com/zeacwg5

.

.

Dr. Jennifer Co-Vu, the girls cardiologist at University of Florida Health, said she saw the parents when they had already been told by at least two high-risk obstetricians that based on the studies and literature, mortality is extremely high  if not almost 100 percent, as quoted by one paper  if there is connection in the heart.

.

But she saw a glimmer of hope.

.

The way they were connected in the upper chambers, one in the right atrium connected to the other in the left atrium, from what I saw from that moment on, we could separate babies, said Co-Vu, clinical assistant professor in the department of pediatrics and director of the hospitals Fetal Cardiac Program. There was a possibility of surgery.

.

The risks were still high. One or both babies could die.

.

Doctors told Clark two days before Christmas that her babies might live only a few hours. A month after hearing that grim news, she wrote in an online journal she kept of her experience about the glimmer of hope she received from Co-Vu.

.

The doctor started drawing pictures and explaining anatomy of the hearts. She said our girls have two fully formed hearts. They are just attached, she wrote. She went through the whole list of pieces and parts, and they have them all. The right size, and where they are supposed to be.

.

She said, they are the most complete and balanced conjoined twins not only has she ever seen, but had been able to research.

.

From there, it was all about waiting. And hope.

.

The girls were born the morning of April 12.

.

They came out holding onto each other, like in a hug, Clark wrote in her journal. And it was beyond precious.

.

They were connected at the liver, diaphragm, sternum and the upper chamber of the heart, known as a thoraco-omphalopagus connection. At 2 months old, doctors operated.

.

One of the technologies that helped Scarlett and Savannah was considered experimental just a few years ago.

.

At the American Heart Associations Scientific Sessions 2014 conference, Dr. Matthew Bramlet presented research about some of the first cases where 3-dimensional printed models of the heart were used to help surgeons treat heart birth defects.

.

Typically, doctors use 2D images taken by X-ray, ultrasound and MRI for surgical planning. But now, with these images as a guide, doctors can use high-tech printers to build detailed 3D models from materials such as plaster or ceramic to help give more detail and reveal even the most complicated structural abnormalities.

.

In two years, the use of 3-D printing in medicine is growing exponentially, moving from experimental use to breaking new ground. The models are used in surgery pre-planning, determining the best treatment, and how and where to operate.

.

.

WEBBIB1617

http://tinyurl.com/gtdzaq3
.

.

Sincerely,
David Dillard
Temple University
(215) 204 – 4584
jwne@temple.edu
http://workface.com/e/daviddillard

Net-Gold
https://groups.io/g/Net-Gold
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html
https://groups.io/org/groupsio/Net-Gold/archives
http://net-gold.3172864.n2.nabble.com/

Temple University and Google Sites Research Guides
AND Discussion Group Directory
http://tinyurl.com/ngda2hk

OR

https://sites.google.com/site/researchguidesonsites/

RESEARCH PAPER WRITING
http://guides.temple.edu/research-papers
EMPLOYMENT
http://guides.temple.edu/employment-guide
INTERNSHIPS
http://guides.temple.edu/employment-internships
HOSPITALITY
http://guides.temple.edu/hospitality-guide
DISABILITIES AND EMPLOYMENT
http://guides.temple.edu/c.php?g=134557
INDOOR GARDENING
https://groups.io/g/indoor-gardening
Educator-Gold
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Educator-Gold/
K12ADMINLIFE
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/K12AdminLIFE/

PUBLIC HEALTH RESOURCES INCLUDING EBOLA
http://guides.temple.edu/public-health-guide

STATISTICS SOURCES RESEARCH GUIDE
http://guides.temple.edu/statistics-sources

Social Work and Social Issues Discussion Group
https://groups.io/g/social-work

Tourism Discussion Group
https://groups.io/g/Tourism

Digital Scholarship Discussion Group
https://groups.io/g/DigitalScholarship/threads
https://listserv.temple.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DIGITAL-SCHOLARSHIP
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/digital-scholarship/info
https://digitalscholarshipandscholarlypublication.wordpress.com/

Copyright Research Guide
Copyright, Intellectual Property and Plagiarism Sources
http://guides.temple.edu/copyright-plagiarism
Fair Use
http://guides.temple.edu/fair-use

Blog
https://educatorgold.wordpress.com/

Articles by David Dillard
https://sites.google.com/site/daviddillardsarticles/

Information Literacy (Russell Conwell Guide)
http://tinyurl.com/78a4shn

Nina Dillard’s Photographs on Net-Gold
http://www.flickr.com/photos/neemers/

Twitter: davidpdillard

Temple University Site Map
https://sites.google.com/site/templeunivsitemap/home

Bushell, R. & Sheldon, P. (eds),
Wellness and Tourism: Mind, Body, Spirit,
Place, New York: Cognizant Communication Books.
Wellness Tourism: Bibliographic and Webliographic Essay
David P. Dillard
http://tinyurl.com/o4pn4o9

Rail Transportation
https://groups.io/org/groupsio/RailTransportation

INDOOR GARDENING
Improve Your Chances for Indoor Gardening Success
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/IndoorGardeningUrban/

SPORT-MED
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/sport-med.html
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sports-med/
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/sport-med.html

HEALTH DIET FITNESS RECREATION SPORTS TOURISM
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/healthrecsport/info
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/health-recreation-sports-tourism.html

.

.

Please Ignore All Links to JIGLU
in search results for Net-Gold and related lists.
The Net-Gold relationship with JIGLU has
been terminated by JIGLU and these are dead links.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/30664
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/healthrecsport/message/145
Temple University Listserv Alert :
Years 2009 and 2010 Eliminated from Archives
https://sites.google.com/site/templeuniversitylistservalert/

.

.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

.

.

.

 

Groups.io Links:

You receive all messages sent to this group.

View This Message (#162):

 

 

https://groups.io/g/DigitalScholarship/message/162

 

.

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s